Archive

Archive for May 15, 2019

How to Add Hollywood Special Effects to Your Videos by J. D. BIERSDORFER


By J. D. BIERSDORFER

With your smartphone, inexpensive software and a bit of cloth or paper, you can make your own “green screen” movies.

Published: May 14, 2019 at 07:00PM

from NYT Technology https://nyti.ms/2Vuj9ux
via IFTTT

Categories: Internet Tags: ,

Personalized Scams

Cyber criminals now have a wealth of information on almost all of us. With so many hacked organizations now a days, cyber criminals simply purchase databases with personal information on millions of people, then use that information to customize their attacks, making them far more realistic. Just because an urgent email has your home address, phone number or birth date in it does not mean it is legitimate.

from SANS Institute Security Awareness Tip of the Day http://bit.ly/30lu8KD
via IFTTT

The Man Behind San Francisco’s Facial Recognition Ban Is Working on More. Way More. by KATE CONGER


By KATE CONGER

Brian Hofer, a paralegal who drafted the ordinance, is pushing for anti-surveillance measures across California. He has already gotten more than two dozen approved.

Published: May 14, 2019 at 07:00PM

from NYT Technology https://nyti.ms/2HrnUQS
via IFTTT

Categories: Internet Tags: ,

How the Promise of a $120 Billion Uber I.P.O. Evaporated by MIKE ISAAC, MICHAEL J. de la MERCED and ANDREW ROSS SORKIN


By MIKE ISAAC, MICHAEL J. de la MERCED and ANDREW ROSS SORKIN

Uber’s offering was supposed to be a crowning moment for the ride-hailing company. But it suffered setback after setback and ultimately resulted in pointed questions for all involved.

Published: May 14, 2019 at 07:00PM

from NYT Technology https://nyti.ms/2w1s1xG
via IFTTT

Categories: Internet Tags: ,

GDPR Drives Changes, but Privacy by Design Proves Elusive

One year later, the EU mandate’s biggest impact has been to focus more attention on data protection and privacy, security analysts say.

from Dark Reading: https://ubm.io/2HmMF1G
via IFTTT

A Tough Week for IP Address Scammers

In the early days of the Internet, there was a period when Internet Protocol version 4 (IPv4) addresses (e.g. 4.4.4.4) were given out like cotton candy to anyone who asked. But these days companies are queuing up to obtain new IP space from the various regional registries that periodically dole out the prized digits. With the value of a single IP hovering between $15-$25, those registries are now fighting a wave of shady brokers who specialize in securing new IP address blocks under false pretenses and then reselling to spammers. Here’s the story of one broker who fought back in the courts, and lost spectacularly.

On May 14, South Carolina U.S. Attorney Sherri Lydon filed criminal wire fraud charges against Amir Golestan, alleging he and his Charleston, S.C. based company Micfo LLC orchestrated an elaborate network of phony companies and aliases to secure more than 735,000 IPs from the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN), a nonprofit which oversees IP addresses assigned to entities in the U.S., Canada, and parts of the Caribbean.

Interestingly, Micfo itself set this process in motion late last year when it sued ARIN. In December 2018, Micfo’s attorneys asked a federal court in Virginia to issue a temporary restraining order against ARIN, which had already told the company about its discovery of the phony front companies and was threatening to revoke some 735,000 IP addresses. That is, unless Micfo agreed to provide more information about its operations and customers.

At the time, many of the IP address blocks assigned to Micfo had been freshly resold to spammers. Micfo ultimately declined to provide ARIN the requested information, and as a result the court denied Micfo’s request (the transcript of that hearing is instructive and amusing).

But by virtue of the contract Micfo signed with ARIN, any further dispute had to be settled via arbitration. On May 13, that arbitration panel ordered Micfo to pay $350,000 for ARIN’s legal fees and to cough up any of those 735,000 IPs the company hadn’t already sold.

According to the criminal indictment in South Carolina, in 2017 and 2018 Golestan sold IP addresses using a third party broker:

“Golestan sold 65,536 IPv4 addresses for $13 each, for a total of $851,896,” the indictment alleges. “Golestan also organized a second transaction for another 65,536 IP addresses, for another approximately $1 million. During this same time period, Golestan had a contract to sell 327,680 IP addresses at $19 per address, for a total of $6.22 million” [this last transaction would be blocked.]

The various front companies alleged to have been run by Micfo and Amir Golestan.

Mr. Golestan could not be immediately reached for comment. Golestan’s attorney in Micfo’s lawsuit against ARIN declined to comment on either the criminal charges or the arbitration outcome. Calls to nearly a dozen of the front companies named in the dispute mostly just rang and rang with no answer, or went to voicemail boxes that were full.

Stephen Ryan is a Washington, D.C.-based attorney who represented ARIN in the dispute filed by Micfo. Ryan said this was the first time ARIN’s decision to revoke IP address space resulted in a court battle — let alone arbitration.

“We have revoked addresses for fraud before, but that hasn’t previously resulted in litigation,” Ryan said. “The interesting thing here is that they litigated this for five months.”

According to a press release by ARIN, “Micfo obtained and utilized 11 shelf companies across the United States, and intentionally created false aliases purporting to be officers of those companies, to induce ARIN into issuing the fraudulently sought IPv4 resources and approving related transfers and reassignments of these addresses. The defrauding party was monetizing the assets obtained in the transfer market, and obtained resources under ARIN’s waiting list process.”

“This was an elaborate operation,” said Ryan, a former federal prosecutor. “All eleven of these front companies for Micfo are still up on the Web, where you see all these wonderful people who allegedly work there. And meanwhile we were receiving notarized affidavits in the names of people that were false. It made it much more interesting to do this case because it created 11 states where they’d violated the law.”

The criminal complaint against Golestan and Micfo (PDF) includes 20 counts of wire fraud associated with the phony companies allegedly set up by Micfo.

John Levine, author of The Internet for Dummies and a member of the security and stability advisory committee at ICANN, said ARIN does not exactly have a strong reputation for going after the myriad IP address scammers allegedly operating in a similar fashion as Micfo.

“It is definitely the case that for a long time ARIN has not been very aggressive about checking the validity of IP address applications and transfers, and now it seems they are somewhat better than they used to be,” Levine said. “A lot of people have been frustrated that ARIN doesn’t act more like a regulator in this space. Given how increasingly valuable IPv4 space is, ARIN has to be more vigilant because the incentive for crooks to do this kind of thing is very high.”

Asked if ARIN would have the stomach and budget to continue the fight if other IP address scammers fight back in a similar way, Ryan said ARIN would not back down from the challenge.

“If we find a scheme or artifice to defraud and it’s a substantial number of addresses and its egregious fraud, then yes, we have a reserve set aside for litigation and we can and will use it for cases like this,” Ryan said, adding that he’d welcome anyone with evidence of similar schemes to come forward. “But a better strategy is not to issue it and never have to go back and revoke it, and we’re good at that now.”

from Krebs on Security http://bit.ly/2YyxLLl
via IFTTT

15th May: Once Upon a Time in Mumbai Dobaara! (2013), 2hr 21m [TV-14] – Streaming Again (5.4/10)

[Streaming Again] This turbulent sequel to Once Upon a Time in Mumbai carries on the saga of the gangland don Shoaib Khan, who continues pressing for more control.

from New On Netflix USA http://bit.ly/2Edhjsj
via IFTTT