A real estate agent data breach would be devastating for renters. They collect too much personal information | Samantha Floreani

Does a breach need to happen before we see regulatory change?

Thanks to Optus, millions of people are now acutely aware of what can happen when companies don’t take privacy and security seriously. But telcos aren’t alone in collecting and storing too much of our personal information. The real estate industry is often overlooked in conversations about data security, but it is one of the most invasive, with potentially devastating consequences for renters across the country.

If you’ve ever been a renter, this is probably a familiar story: you’re searching for somewhere to live, rents are high, competition is stiff, and in the process of applying you’re asked for immense amounts of information. In addition to identification documents (which we are all now very protective of), they probably ask for a background check, bank statements, and years’ worth of employment and rental history. You might feel uncomfortable about how much they ask for, but hey, what can you do? If you say no, someone else will say yes and get the house instead.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/zIrlwqs
via IFTTT

Optus tells former Virgin Mobile and Gomo customers they could also be part of data breach

Identification repair service receives a month’s worth of complaint calls in three days as government pressures telco to pay for replacement ID documents

Former Virgin Mobile and Gomo customers are the latest to have been informed by Optus that their personal information was exposed in the company’s massive data breach, as an identification repair service reveals it has fielded a month’s worth of complaint calls in three days.

It has been a week since Optus first revealed up to 10 million of its customers had personal information – including names, addresses, emails and dates of birth – exposed, with 2.8 million having passport, licence or Medicare numbers also made visible.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3Pg9Gzf
via IFTTT

Attorney general flags urgent privacy law changes after Optus data breach

Mark Dreyfus indicates potential reforms to laws regarding data breaches including higher penalties, mandatory precautions and customer notifications

Privacy law changes, including tougher penalties for data breaches, could be legislated as early as this year, the attorney general has said in the wake of the Optus breach.

Mark Dreyfus revealed on Thursday that in addition to completing a review of Australia’s privacy laws the Albanese government will look to legislate “even more urgent reforms” late this year or in early 2023.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/oYuQ8zd
via IFTTT

Australia news live: Optus contacting 14,900 customers with exposed Medicare ID, consumer watchdog warns petrol stations over price rises

The fuel excise reduction has ended, but service stations have been warned not to pass on the price increase straight away. Follow the day’s news live

Is a cyber security overhaul from the federal government on the cards?

The attorney general Mark Dreyfus told ABC News Breakfast what that could like with details of the government’s response to the Optus data breach:

We’ve been working very hard for a week when the shocking details of this massive data breach were revealed. Rightly millions and millions of Australians past and former Optus customers are very worried about what’s happened.

We’ve had the Treasurer working with banks and financial institutions, we’ve got the Minister for Communications, the Minister for Home Affairs, and me, because I’m responsible for the privacy act, we’ve all been working with Optus and we’ve been working with each other. The Australian Federal Police has been working with the FBI to try and track down the perpetrators.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/mNW1TZb
via IFTTT

Anthony Albanese says ‘Optus should pay’ for new passports for data breach victims

Push comes day after states suggest telco will pick up multi-million dollar tab for replacing driver’s licences of affected customers

The federal government has demanded Optus pay for new passports for customers caught up in the telco’s data breach, as the prime minister flagged an overhaul of laws relating to how companies collect personal information.

The foreign minister, Penny Wong, has written to Optus raising concerns about criminals exploiting data harvested in the cyber hack, saying there was “no justification” for victims or taxpayers to foot the bill for replacing compromised documents.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/ymgu082
via IFTTT

Optus customers, not the company, are the real victims of massive data breach | Justin Warren

Optus executives are paid millions to ensure that, among other things, customer data is safe. These are the people who should be held accountable for the data breach.

The Optus data breach has brought data security into the forefront of every Australian’s mind. While it’s good people are thinking about these issues, the best time to start thinking about them was years ago. The second-best time is now. It’s important then that we analyse how Optus has handled this breach so far, and what needs to be done to ensure it doesn’t happen again.

Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/oR1eiD5
via IFTTT

Sophisticated attack or human error?: how Optus lost control of your data

In the days since Optus first reported that potentially millions of its customers’ private information – from birth dates to Medicare numbers – had been breached, it has faced threats of blackmail, a potential class action and a public spat with the home affairs minister.

Reporter Josh Taylor and Jane Lee discuss the fallout from the data breach and whether this was a ‘sophisticated attack’ on the telco, or a failure of the company’s own security systems

Read more:

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/VInSWmO
via IFTTT

Optus data breach: Australians will be able to change their driver’s licence with telco to pay

Federal opposition wants commonwealth to allow people to get new passports for free too – and quickly

Australians caught up in a massive breach of Optus data will be able to change their driver’s licence numbers and get new cards, with the telco expected to bear the multi-million cost of the changeover.

The New South Wales, Victorian, Queensland and South Australia governments on Tuesday evening began clearing the bureaucratic hurdles for anyone who can prove they are victims of the hack, which has affected millions of people.

Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/czYKk79
via IFTTT

Attorney general says FBI is working on Optus data breach – video

Attorney general Mark Dreyfus says the FBI is working with local authorities to investigate the Optus data breach. ‘The government, as well as the Australian federal police and other government agencies, are working closely together on the Optus data breach,’ he said. 

‘The Australian federal police is taking this very seriously with a large number of officers involved, working with other federal government agencies and state and territory police, and with the FBI in the United States and with industry.’

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/0Z8F7Qr
via IFTTT

Police ‘all over’ dark web ransom threat to release 10,000 customer records a day, Optus CEO says

Purported hackers post ultimatum demanding $1m within four days after massive Optus data breach

The chief executive of Optus, Kelly Bayer Rosmarin, says federal police are “all over” a post on the dark web purporting to release 10,000 customer records from the recent data breach and demanding a $1m ransom for the rest.

Rosmarin also told ABC radio the company’s massive security breach was “not as being portrayed”, after the minister for home affairs accused the company of leaving the “window open” for the data to be stolen.

Sign up to receive an email with the top stories from Guardian Australia every morning

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/jVBTyfu
via IFTTT