At least 13 phone firms hit by suspected Chinese hackers since 2019, say experts

LightBasin hackers were able to obtain subscriber information and call metadata, says CrowdStrike

At least 13 phone companies around the world have been compromised since 2019 by sophisticated hackers who are believed to come from China, a cybersecurity expert group has said.

The roaming hackers – known as LightBasin – were able to deploy scanning tools in compromised networks “to retrieve highly specific information”, according to CrowdStrike, a group regularly cited by western intelligence.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3pgY7SJ
via IFTTT

NSO Pegasus spyware can no longer target UK phone numbers

Israeli maker of surveillance software blocked +44 code after detecting hack against Princess Haya, source says

The powerful spyware used to hack into mobile phones belonging to Princess Haya and her divorce lawyer Fiona Shackleton is no longer effective against UK numbers, sources familiar with the software’s developer have said.

NSO Group, the Israeli maker of the Pegasus surveillance tool, implemented a change preventing client countries from targeting +44 numbers, the sources said, after it became aware of the British hacking scandal on 5 August of last year.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3lmCA8N
via IFTTT

Timeline of events in lives of Dubai ruler’s daughters and ex-wife

From alleged abduction of daughters to hacking ex-wife’s phone, family affairs of Sheikh Mohammed over 20 years

Princess Shamsa, then 19, is abducted from the streets of Cambridge, it is alleged by staff working for her father, Sheikh Mohammed al-Maktoum, and forced to return to the United Arab Emirates. The Guardian is the first to report in December 2001 that detectives are examining Shamsa’s kidnapping by agents of her father.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3FxV6n0
via IFTTT

Dubai ruler hacked ex-wife using NSO Pegasus spyware, high court judge finds

Sheikh Mohammed used spyware on Princess Haya and five associates in unlawful abuse of power, judge rules

The ruler of Dubai hacked the phone of his ex-wife Princess Haya using NSO Group’s controversial Pegasus spyware in an unlawful abuse of power and trust, a senior high court judge has ruled.

The president of the family division found that agents acting on behalf of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum, who is also prime minister of the United Arab Emirates, a close Gulf ally of Britain, hacked Haya and five of her associates while the couple were locked in court proceedings in London concerning the welfare of their two children.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3mnddmM
via IFTTT

‘The walls are closing in on me’: the hacking of Princess Haya

Court judgments reveal how Sheikh Mohammed’s use of Pegasus spyware against his ex-wife was uncovered

Eleven court judgments, covering 181 pages, plus hundreds of other pages of legal documents have revealed an extraordinary spying scandal: state-sponsored mobile phone hacking conducted on behalf of the ruler of Dubai against his fearful sixth and former wife, Princess Haya, Britain’s most famous divorce lawyer and her associate, plus three others – against the backdrop of a bitter child protection battle being played out day after day in the English courts.

The conclusion, after just over a year of intense and costly legal arguments, is that “servants or agents” of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum, the vice-president and prime minister of the United Arab Emirates, engaged in “the surveillance of the six phones” in Britain using technology supplied by Israel’s NSO Group, a company already embroiled in a string of hacking scandals, apparently to further his cause in the welfare battle.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3Fpl2kH
via IFTTT

Nuisance calls could lead to multimillion-pound fines in UK

Ministers considering bringing punishment in line with GDPR, which can issue fine of up to £17.5m

Multimillion-pound fines could be imposed for nuisance or fraudulent calls and texts under a proposed overhaul of the UK’s data rules.

Companies behind nuisance communications can be fined £500,000 by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) but ministers are considering bringing the punishment in line with General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which can issue a fine of up to £17.5m or 4% of global turnover.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3C2705I
via IFTTT

What is GDPR and why does the UK want to reshape its data laws?

The government says an overhaul will boost growth and increase trade – but it must be careful not to go too far

The government has announced plans to reshape the UK’s data laws such as GDPR requirements in an effort, it claims, to boost growth and increase trade post-Brexit. The digital, media and culture secretary, Oliver Dowden, says the UK wants to shape data laws based on “common sense, not box-ticking”.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3sWhNez
via IFTTT

UK to overhaul privacy rules in post-Brexit departure from GDPR

Culture secretary says move could lead to an end to irritating cookie popups and consent requests online

Britain will attempt to move away from European data protection regulations as it overhauls its privacy rules after Brexit, the government has announced.

The freedom to chart its own course could lead to an end to irritating cookie popups and consent requests online, said the culture secretary, Oliver Dowden, as he called for rules based on “common sense, not box-ticking”.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3ylVX5j
via IFTTT

UK to overhaul privacy rules in post-Brexit departure from GDPR

Culture secretary says move could lead to an end to irritating cookie popups and consent requests online

Britain will attempt to move away from European data protection regulations as it overhauls its privacy rules after Brexit, the government has announced.

The freedom to chart its own course could lead to an end to irritating cookie popups and consent requests online, said the culture secretary, Oliver Dowden, as he called for rules based on “common sense, not box-ticking”.

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/3ylVX5j
via IFTTT

Australians hit by ‘Flubot’ malware that arrives by text message

New scam spreads to Australia from Europe, targeting thousands of Android users

Thousands of Australians have been hit by a new scam text message known as Flubot, which aims to install malware on their phones.

Flubot is a type of malware targeting Android users, but iPhone users can also receive the messages. It tells the receiver they missed a call or have a new voicemail, providing a fake link to listen.

Related: Password of three random words better than complex variation, experts say

Related: How NSO became the company whose software can spy on the world

Continue reading…

from Data and computer security | The Guardian https://ift.tt/2W37z08
via IFTTT